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Contents

About This Guide

Chapter 1: Introduction

Principles of VNC remote control

Getting the computers ready to use

Connectivity and feature matrix

What to read next

Chapter 2: Getting Connected

Step 1: Ensure VNC Server is running on the host computer

Step 2: Start VNC Viewer on the client computer

Step 3: Identify VNC Server running on the host computer

Step 4: Request an encrypted connection

Step 5: Connect to VNC Server

Troubleshooting connection

Chapter 3: Using VNC Viewer

Starting VNC Viewer

Starting Listening VNC Viewer

Configuring VNC Viewer before you connect

Connecting to a host computer

The VNC Viewer user experience

Using the toolbar

Using the shortcut menu

Using the VNC Viewer - Options dialog

Managing the current connection

Changing appearance and behavior

Restricting access to features

Chapter 4: Connecting From A Web Browser

Connecting to a host computer

The VNC Viewer for Java user experience

Working with VNC Viewer for Java

Chapter 5: Exchanging Information

Printing host computer files to a local printer

Transfering files between client and host computers

Copying and pasting text between client and host computers

Communicating securely using chat

Chapter 6: Setting Up VNC Server

Licensing VNC Server

Starting VNC Server

Running multiple instances of VNC Server

Working with VNC Server

Configuring ports

Notifying when users connect

Preventing connections to VNC Server

Restricting functionality for connected users

Stopping VNC Server

Chapter 7: Making Connections Secure

Authenticating connections to VNC Server

Relaxing the authentication rules

Bypassing the authentication rules

Changing the encryption rules

Preventing particular connections to VNC Server

Restricting features for particular connected users

Uniquely identifying VNC Server

Protecting privacy

Appendix A: Saving Connections

Saving connections to VNC Address Book

Using VNC Address Book to connect

Managing connections using VNC Address Book

Saving connections to desktop icons

Previous Next Chapter 7, Making Connections Secure

Changing the encryption rules

By default, all network communications to and from a host computer running VNC Server (Enterprise) or VNC Server (Personal) are encrypted using 128-bit AES technology. Identity is certified using 2048 bit RSA public/private keys.

Note: VNC Server (Free) does not support encryption. Upgrade the host computer to VNC Server (Enterprise) or VNC Server (Personal) if security is important to you.

For VNC Server (Enterprise), you can:

•  Relax the encryption rules if you are sure all potential client computers are within a secure network environment, and that eavesdropping is impossible. This may improve performance. It may also allow older versions of VNC Viewer, or VNC-compatible Viewer technology, that do not support encryption to connect.

Note: Even if encryption is turned off, passwords are still encrypted.

•  Tighten the encryption rules by increasing the AES key size to 256-bit. This makes connections ultra-secure, but may impact performance slightly. It also means only VNC Viewer 4.6 or later can connect.

For VNC Server (Personal), you can just relax the encryption rules. 256-bit AES encryption is not available. Upgrade the host computer to VNC Server (Enterprise) if security is important to you.

Note: A connecting user can request that the encryption rules be tightened, but not relaxed.

To change the rules, open the VNC Server - Options dialog. More on this dialog. On the Connections tab, select an alternative to the default Always on option from the Encryption dropdown:

Choose:

•  Always maximum to specify 256-bit AES. Note that only VNC Viewer 4.6 or later can connect. A connecting user cannot request that encryption be turned off, or the AES key size reduced to 128-bit.

•  Prefer on to prefer, though not mandate, that connections be encrypted using 128-bit AES. A connecting user can either request that encryption be turned off (by selecting Prefer off in the VNC Viewer dialog), or the AES key size be increased to 256-bit (by selecting Always maximum in the VNC Viewer dialog).

•  Prefer off to prefer, though not mandate, that connections be unencrypted. Choose this option to allow older versions of VNC Viewer, or VNC-compatible Viewer technology, to connect. A connecting user can request that encryption be turned back on, either to 128-bit AES (by selecting Prefer on or Always on in the VNC Viewer dialog), or to 256-bit AES (by selecting Always maximum in the VNC Viewer dialog).

For more information about requesting encryption in the VNC Viewer dialog, see Step 4: Request an encrypted connection.