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Contents

About This Guide

Chapter 1: Introduction

Principles of VNC remote control

Getting the computers ready to use

Connectivity and feature matrix

What to read next

Chapter 2: Getting Connected

Step 1: Ensure VNC Server is running on the host computer

Step 2: Start VNC Viewer on the client computer

Step 3: Identify VNC Server running on the host computer

Step 4: Request an encrypted connection

Step 5: Connect to VNC Server

Troubleshooting connection

Chapter 3: Using VNC Viewer

Starting VNC Viewer

Starting Listening VNC Viewer

Configuring VNC Viewer before you connect

Connecting to a host computer

The VNC Viewer user experience

Using the toolbar

Using the shortcut menu

Using the VNC Viewer - Options dialog

Managing the current connection

Changing appearance and behavior

Restricting access to features

Chapter 4: Connecting From A Web Browser

Connecting to a host computer

The VNC Viewer for Java user experience

Working with VNC Viewer for Java

Chapter 5: Exchanging Information

Printing host computer files to a local printer

Transfering files between client and host computers

Copying and pasting text between client and host computers

Communicating securely using chat

Chapter 6: Setting Up VNC Server

Licensing VNC Server

Starting VNC Server

Running multiple instances of VNC Server

Working with VNC Server

Configuring ports

Notifying when users connect

Preventing connections to VNC Server

Restricting functionality for connected users

Stopping VNC Server

Chapter 7: Making Connections Secure

Authenticating connections to VNC Server

Relaxing the authentication rules

Bypassing the authentication rules

Changing the encryption rules

Preventing particular connections to VNC Server

Restricting features for particular connected users

Uniquely identifying VNC Server

Protecting privacy

Appendix A: Saving Connections

Saving connections to VNC Address Book

Using VNC Address Book to connect

Managing connections using VNC Address Book

Saving connections to desktop icons

Previous Next Chapter 7, Making Connections Secure

Relaxing the authentication rules

You can relax the authentication rules for all prospective users if you consider it safe to do so. For more information on the default authentication mechanisms, see Authenticating connections to VNC Server.

Note: Alternatively, you can allow particular users to bypass authentication altogether. For more information, see Bypassing the authentication rules.

For VNC Server (Enterprise), you can relax the authentication rules so that users:

•  Need only enter a VNC password. This forgoes the need to publish host computer user credentials, and for users to have to remember a user name. For more information, see Authenticating using a VNC password.

•  Authenticate automatically using the credentials the user has already entered to log on to their client computer. This speeds up the connection process and helps prevent password fatigue. For more information, see Authenticating automatically using client computer user credentials.

•  Do not have to authenticate at all. This may allow older versions of VNC Viewer (or VNC-compatible Viewer technology) that do not support authentication to connect. For more information, see Turning authentication off.

For VNC Server (Personal), you can relax the authentication rules so that users need only enter a VNC password, or do not have to authenticate at all. For VNC Server (Free), you can only relax the rules so that users do not have to authenticate at all. Upgrade the host computer to VNC Server (Enterprise) if security is important to you.

Authenticating automatically using client computer user credentials

You can configure VNC Server (Enterprise) to authenticate a user automatically using the credentials already entered by that user to log on to their client computer. Note this authentication mechanism is only effective in a managed network environment, with (for example) a Kerberos authentication server.

Note: VNC Server (Free) and VNC Server (Personal) do not support single sign-on. Upgrade the host computer to VNC Server (Enterprise) if security is important to you.

To do this, choose the Single Sign On option in the Authentication dropdown of the VNC Server - Options dialog. More on this dialog.

There is no need to publish credentials to prospective users. Once connected, users:

•  Acquire a set of privileges (that is, access rights) on the host computer enabling particular operations to be performed.

•  Are granted a set of VNC permissions, permitting access to RealVNC™ remote control features for the duration of the connection.

The same privileges and VNC permissions are granted as for system authentication. See Authenticating using host computer user credentials for more information.

Turning authentication off

You can turn authentication off for all users. Note you should only do this if you are sure all prospective users are trustworthy.

Note: You can allow just particular users to connect without supplying a password. See Bypassing the authentication rules for more information.

To do this, choose the None option in the Authentication dropdown of the VNC Server - Options dialog. More on this dialog.

(Note this option is only available when the dialog is in Advanced mode.)

There is no need to publish credentials to prospective users.

Once connected, users acquire a set of privileges (that is, access rights) on the host computer enabling particular operations to be performed. The same privileges are granted as for system authentication. See Authenticating using host computer user credentials for more information.