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Contents

About This Guide

Chapter 1: Introduction

Principles of VNC remote control

Getting the computers ready to use

Connectivity and feature matrix

What to read next

Chapter 2: Getting Connected

Step 1: Ensure VNC Server is running on the host computer

Step 2: Start VNC Viewer on the client computer

Step 3: Identify VNC Server running on the host computer

Step 4: Request an encrypted connection

Step 5: Connect to VNC Server

Troubleshooting connection

Chapter 3: Using VNC Viewer

Starting VNC Viewer

Starting Listening VNC Viewer

Configuring VNC Viewer before you connect

Connecting to a host computer

The VNC Viewer user experience

Using the toolbar

Using the shortcut menu

Using the VNC Viewer - Options dialog

Managing the current connection

Changing appearance and behavior

Restricting access to features

Chapter 4: Connecting From A Web Browser

Connecting to a host computer

The VNC Viewer for Java user experience

Working with VNC Viewer for Java

Chapter 5: Exchanging Information

Printing host computer files to a local printer

Transfering files between client and host computers

Copying and pasting text between client and host computers

Communicating securely using chat

Chapter 6: Setting Up VNC Server

Licensing VNC Server

Starting VNC Server

Running multiple instances of VNC Server

Working with VNC Server

Configuring ports

Notifying when users connect

Preventing connections to VNC Server

Restricting functionality for connected users

Stopping VNC Server

Chapter 7: Making Connections Secure

Authenticating connections to VNC Server

Relaxing the authentication rules

Bypassing the authentication rules

Changing the encryption rules

Preventing particular connections to VNC Server

Restricting features for particular connected users

Uniquely identifying VNC Server

Protecting privacy

Appendix A: Saving Connections

Saving connections to VNC Address Book

Using VNC Address Book to connect

Managing connections using VNC Address Book

Saving connections to desktop icons

Previous Next Chapter 6, Setting Up VNC Server

Starting VNC Server

To start VNC Server, follow the appropriate instructions for the host computer’s platform below.

Note: As soon as VNC Server is licensed and started, users can connect. To delay or prevent connections, see Preventing connections to VNC Server.

Windows

VNC Server can start in Service Mode, in User Mode, or both. For more information on these modes, which you might want to use, and why you might want to run more than one instance of VNC Server, see Running multiple instances of VNC Server.

To start VNC Server:

•  In Service Mode, select RealVNC > VNC Server from the Start menu. Note administrative privileges are required to perform this operation.

Note: By default, VNC Server automatically starts as a service when the computer is powered on. If you explicitly stop VNC Server, however, the service does not automatically restart when the computer is rebooted.

•  In User Mode, select RealVNC > Advanced > VNC Server (User Mode) from the Start menu.

Note: Microsoft User Account Control severely restricts users connected to VNC Server in User Mode from fully controlling a host computer running Windows Vista or later.

The VNC Server dialog opens:

(In this picture, VNC Server is running in Service Mode.)

The VNC Server dialog is the gateway to VNC Server and all its features. More on this dialog.

Click the Hide button to minimize the VNC Server dialog but keep VNC Server running in the background. To access the dialog again, double-click the VNC Server icon in the Notification area. More on this icon.

To see how to explicitly stop VNC Server, or to learn why VNC Server might stop automatically, read Stopping VNC Server.

UNIX/Linux

VNC Server can start in User Mode, in Virtual Mode, or both, as many times as your license permits. For more information on these modes, which you might want to use, and why you might want to run more than one instance of VNC Server, see Running multiple instances of VNC Server.

Note: VNC Server can also start in Service Mode, as soon as the host computer boots, and irrespective of whether or not a host computer user is logged on. For more information on this mode in this release, visit www.realvnc.com/products/vnc/documentation/5.0/misc/reference/vncserver-x11-serviced.

To start VNC Server:

•  In User Mode, either:

— Select Applications > Internet > VNC Server (User Mode) from the menu system, if available.

— Run the command vncserver-x11 in a Terminal window, and press the ENTER key. Note you should not do this as a user with administrative privileges.

The VNC Server dialog opens:

The VNC Server dialog is the gateway to VNC Server in User Mode and all its features. More on this dialog.

Under most versions of UNIX and Linux, you can click the Hide button to minimize the VNC Server dialog but keep VNC Server in User Mode running in the background. To access the dialog again, click the VNC Server icon in the Notification Area. More on this icon.

•  In Virtual Mode, run the command vncserver-virtual in a Terminal window, and press the ENTER key. Note you should not do this as a user with administrative privileges. A message ending with text similar to the following appears:

New desktop is johndoe:1 (192.168.0.187:1)

This operation starts VNC Server in Virtual Mode attached to a virtual desktop, detached from the monitor, and independent of the console. This means that no VNC Server icon and VNC Server dialog comparable to those found in User Mode can be displayed. To see how to work with VNC Server in this mode, read Working with VNC Server in Virtual Mode.

A virtual desktop is assigned an X Server session number corresponding to the port on which VNC Server is listening for connection requests. In the example above, this is session number 1, corresponding to port 5901. For more information on ports, see Configuring ports.

To see how to explicitly stop VNC Server, or to learn why VNC Server might stop automatically, read Stopping VNC Server.

Mac OS X

VNC Server can start in Service Mode, in User Mode, or both. In addition, VNC Server can start in User Mode (for different users) as many times as your license permits. For more information on these modes, which you might want to use, and why you might want to run more than one instance of VNC Server, see Running multiple instances of VNC Server.

To start VNC Server:

•  In Service Mode, navigate to the Applications > RealVNC folder, and double-click the VNC Server program. Note administrative privileges are required to perform this operation.

Note: VNC Server automatically starts when the computer powers on.

•  In User Mode, navigate to the Applications > RealVNC > Advanced folder, and double-click the VNC Server (User Mode) program.

The VNC Server dialog opens:

(In this picture, VNC Server is running in Service Mode.)

The VNC Server dialog is the gateway to VNC Server and all its operations. More on this dialog.

Click the Hide button to minimize the VNC Server dialog but keep VNC Server running in the background. To access the dialog again, click the VNC Server icon in the Status bar and, from the shortcut menu, select Open. More on this icon.

To see how to explicitly stop VNC Server, or to learn why VNC Server might stop automatically, read Stopping VNC Server.

Working with VNC Server in Virtual Mode

Note: The information in this section applies to VNC Server for UNIX/Linux only.

VNC Server in Virtual Mode starts unattached to any physical display hardware. This means that desktop artifacts to help you work with VNC Server, such as a VNC Server icon and VNC Server dialog, are not available.

To configure VNC Server in Virtual Mode, you can instead:

•  Specify parameters on start-up. See Specifying parameters on start-up.

•  Configure VNC Server as a connected user. See Configuring VNC Server as a connected user.

Note that changes made using either method are lost when VNC Server stops.

Specifying parameters on start-up

You can configure VNC Server in Virtual Mode on start-up using parameters.

Parameters can be specified in configuration files, in which case they apply to all instances of VNC Server in Virtual Mode automatically, or at the command line when a particular instance starts. VNC Server reads parameters in the following order:

1. The system configuration file: /etc/vnc/config.d/Xvnc.

2. The configuration file of the user starting VNC Server: $HOME/.vnc/config.d/Xvnc.

3. Appended to the vncserver-virtual command at the command line.

Parameters specified later in this list override duplicates specified earlier.

For a full list of parameters, run the command vncserver-virtual -list. For more information, run the command man vncserver-virtual.

Configuring VNC Server as a connected user

You can connect to VNC Server in Virtual Mode and configure it as a connected user. When you disconnect, your changes apply to all future connections to this instance of VNC Server while it runs.

Note: To see how to use VNC Viewer to connect to VNC Server, read Connecting to a host computer. You will need to qualify the network address of the host computer with the X Server session number assigned when VNC Server starts, for example 192.168.0.187:1.

Under most versions of UNIX/Linux, when you connect, a VNC Server icon is visible to the connected user. For more information on this icon, including how to use it to open the VNC Server dialog and configure VNC Server, start with Using the VNC Server icon.

Note: If another user connects, the VNC Server icon is shaded black.