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Contents

About This Guide

Chapter 1: Introduction

Principles of VNC remote control

Getting the computers ready to use

Connectivity and feature matrix

What to read next

Chapter 2: Getting Connected

Step 1: Ensure VNC Server is running on the host computer

Step 2: Start VNC Viewer on the client computer

Step 3: Identify VNC Server running on the host computer

Step 4: Request an encrypted connection

Step 5: Connect to VNC Server

Troubleshooting connection

Chapter 3: Using VNC Viewer

Starting VNC Viewer

Starting Listening VNC Viewer

Configuring VNC Viewer before you connect

Connecting to a host computer

The VNC Viewer user experience

Using the toolbar

Using the shortcut menu

Using the VNC Viewer - Options dialog

Managing the current connection

Changing appearance and behavior

Restricting access to features

Chapter 4: Connecting From A Web Browser

Connecting to a host computer

The VNC Viewer for Java user experience

Working with VNC Viewer for Java

Chapter 5: Exchanging Information

Printing host computer files to a local printer

Transfering files between client and host computers

Copying and pasting text between client and host computers

Communicating securely using chat

Chapter 6: Setting Up VNC Server

Licensing VNC Server

Starting VNC Server

Running multiple instances of VNC Server

Working with VNC Server

Configuring ports

Notifying when users connect

Preventing connections to VNC Server

Restricting functionality for connected users

Stopping VNC Server

Chapter 7: Making Connections Secure

Authenticating connections to VNC Server

Relaxing the authentication rules

Bypassing the authentication rules

Changing the encryption rules

Preventing particular connections to VNC Server

Restricting features for particular connected users

Uniquely identifying VNC Server

Protecting privacy

Appendix A: Saving Connections

Saving connections to VNC Address Book

Using VNC Address Book to connect

Managing connections using VNC Address Book

Saving connections to desktop icons

Previous Next Chapter 3, Using VNC Viewer

The VNC Viewer user experience

The rest of this chapter assumes you are successfully connected to a host computer. If not, see Connecting to a host computer.

When a connection is established, VNC Viewer displays the host computer’s desktop in a new window on the client computer:

A.  Desktop of a client computer running Windows 7.   B.  VNC Viewer displaying the desktop of a host computer running Ubuntu 11.04 Linux.

Note: If the host computer is running UNIX/Linux, VNC Viewer may display a virtual desktop instead, in which case what you see is not the desktop visible to a host computer user. For more information on this feature, see Running multiple instances of VNC Server.

Note that other VNC Viewer users may be connected to the host computer and controlling it at the same time as you. In addition, a host computer user may be present. Operations may occur unexpectedly!

Controlling the host computer using your mouse

Your client computer’s mouse is now shared with the host computer. This means that:

•  Moving the mouse and clicking within the VNC Viewer window affects the host computer and not the client.

•  Moving the mouse and clicking outside the VNC Viewer window, or on the VNC Viewer title bar or window buttons (Minimize, Maximize, and Close), affects the client computer and not the host.

Note: If your mouse has no effect on the host computer, it may have been disabled. For more information, see Restricting access to features.

If client and host computers have different numbers of mouse buttons, you can configure VNC Viewer to emulate those you do not have. See Configuring your mouse for more information.

Controlling the host computer using your keyboard

Your client computer’s keyboard is now shared with the host computer, with the exception of:

•  The function key that opens the shortcut menu (F8 by default).

•  The CTRL-ALT-DELETE key combination.

These commands are interpreted by the client computer. Alternative ways of sending them to the host computer are available; start with Using the shortcut menu for more information. Under Windows, note you can choose for certain other keys or key combinations to be interpreted by your client computer rather than the host. See Configuring your keyboard for more information.

Note: If your keyboard has no effect on the host computer, it may have been disabled. For more information, see Restricting access to features.

Note it is possible for client and host computers to have different types of keyboard. Not all the keys available to a host computer user may be available to you, and some keys with the same name may have different behavior. This is especially likely if you are connecting to Mac OS X from Windows or Linux with a PC keyboard, or vice versa; see www.realvnc.com/products/vnc/documentation/5.0/misc/keyboard-mapping/.

Interacting with VNC Server

When you connect, a VNC Server icon is displayed on the host computer’s desktop, shaded black:

(Windows 7 client computer; Ubuntu 11.10 Linux host)

The VNC Server icon confirms that VNC Server is running on the host computer, provides information to help VNC Viewer users connect, confirms that at least one VNC Viewer user is connected (the icon changes color), and has a shortcut menu to perform useful operations. All this information and functionality is available to you as a connected user. For more information, see Working with VNC Server.

Note: Under UNIX/Linux, in some circumstances, the VNC Server icon is not shaded black. Under some versions, no VNC Server icon can be displayed. In the latter scenario, shortcut menu commands are available from the More button on the VNC Server dialog.

Note that the VNC Server icon also provides access to VNC Server options. However, you cannot configure VNC Server in Service Mode unless you know the credentials of a user with administrative privileges on the host computer (or are logged in as one). For more information, see Using the VNC Server - Options dialog.