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Contents

About This Guide

Chapter 1: Introduction

Principles of VNC remote control

Getting the computers ready to use

Connectivity and feature matrix

What to read next

Chapter 2: Getting Connected

Step 1: Ensure VNC Server is running on the host computer

Step 2: Start VNC Viewer on the client computer

Step 3: Identify VNC Server running on the host computer

Step 4: Request an encrypted connection

Step 5: Connect to VNC Server

Troubleshooting connection

Chapter 3: Using VNC Viewer

Starting VNC Viewer

Starting Listening VNC Viewer

Configuring VNC Viewer before you connect

Connecting to a host computer

The VNC Viewer user experience

Using the toolbar

Using the shortcut menu

Using the VNC Viewer - Options dialog

Managing the current connection

Changing appearance and behavior

Restricting access to features

Chapter 4: Connecting From A Web Browser

Connecting to a host computer

The VNC Viewer for Java user experience

Working with VNC Viewer for Java

Chapter 5: Exchanging Information

Printing host computer files to a local printer

Transfering files between client and host computers

Copying and pasting text between client and host computers

Communicating securely using chat

Chapter 6: Setting Up VNC Server

Licensing VNC Server

Starting VNC Server

Running multiple instances of VNC Server

Working with VNC Server

Configuring ports

Notifying when users connect

Preventing connections to VNC Server

Restricting functionality for connected users

Stopping VNC Server

Chapter 7: Making Connections Secure

Authenticating connections to VNC Server

Relaxing the authentication rules

Bypassing the authentication rules

Changing the encryption rules

Preventing particular connections to VNC Server

Restricting features for particular connected users

Uniquely identifying VNC Server

Protecting privacy

Appendix A: Saving Connections

Saving connections to VNC Address Book

Using VNC Address Book to connect

Managing connections using VNC Address Book

Saving connections to desktop icons

Previous Next Chapter 1, Introduction

Getting the computers ready to use

Before you can establish a connection, certain operations must be performed on both host and client computer.

This section addresses the client computer user and assumes the same person is able (that is, is physically present and has sufficient privileges) to configure the host computer as well. If not, contact a system administrator or a host computer user.

Note: Some operations need only be performed once. Others must be performed before each connection.

Setting up the host computer

1. Ensure the host computer is turned on, has a functioning operating system, and is connected to a network to which the client computer can also connect. This can be:

— A private network such as a LAN or VPN, if both computers are co-located at home or in a typical small office environment.

— A public network such as the Internet for most other kinds of connection, and especially those made from an Internet café, a public Wi-Fi hotspot, or over a mobile (cellular) data network (3G/GPRS/EDGE).

2. Download and install VNC from www.realvnc.com/download/vnc/, and license the VNC Server component. The credentials of a user with administrative privileges on the host computer are required. For more information on licensing, start with Licensing VNC Server.

3. If you are connecting over a public network such as the Internet, it is very likely the host computer will be protected by at least one firewall. If so, each must be configured to allow network communications through to the port on which VNC Server is listening, which is 5900 by default. See Allowing network communications through a firewall for more information.

4. If you are connecting over a public network such as the Internet, it is very likely the host computer will be protected by at least one router. If so, each must be configured to forward network communications through to the port on which VNC Server is listening, which is 5900 by default. See Configuring a router to forward network communications.

5. Make sure VNC Server is running on the host computer and that it can accept incoming connections. See Step 1: Ensure VNC Server is running on the host computer for more information.

6. Find out the network address of VNC Server. If you are connecting:

— Over a LAN or VPN, this must be a private address, which is that of the host computer itself. See Connecting within a private network for more information.

— Over the Internet, this must be a public address, which is that of a router or similar device. See Connecting over the Internet for more information.

7. Find out the credentials required to authenticate to VNC Server. By default, if you are connecting to:

VNC Server (Enterprise) or VNC Server (Personal), you require the user name and password of a user account with administrative privileges on the host computer. Note at least one account on the host computer must have a password set; see Authenticating using host computer user credentials for more information.

VNC Server (Free) , you require a password specific to VNC. For more information, see Authenticating using a VNC password.

Note: If you cannot perform these operations and a host computer user is present, you may be able to jointly perform a reverse connection. See Establishing a reverse connection for more information.

Setting up the client computer

1. Ensure your client computer is turned on, has a functioning operating system, and is connected to the same network as the host computer.

2. Download VNC Viewer from www.realvnc.com/download/viewer/, and save the file to an appropriate location (depending on the download package chosen, you may need to extract it first). Under UNIX and Linux, you must also make the file executable, for example by running the command:

chmod +x <VNC Viewer>

Note: Alternatively, you can download and install VNC on the client computer, and just run the VNC Viewer component, since it does not require a license key. If you do this, VNC Viewer can be started from the menu system of most operating systems, which may be more convenient, and in addition you can save connections to VNC Address Book.

3. If your client computer is protected by a proxy server, specify the details of that proxy server. For more information, see Connecting via a proxy server.