New user

spencer spencer "at" silcom.com
Sun, 02 Sep 2001 16:00:30 +0000


Scott,
I have a similar issue as stated below. Do you have any suggestions?

I am trying to use VNC to access a Windows NT Server (Backup Domain
Controller, BDC). I am accessing the BDC via an all Microsoft VPN. I have
RAS on the Server and use the PPTP protocol to connect. I can connect to the
server (and have been doing this for some time now).

Here is my setup.
Corporate- NT Server, BDC running behind a Linksys BEFSR41 nat router.
Public IP on the Wan side of the Linksys router. Forwarding ports 80, 25,
110, and 1723 (for Linksys to work with VPN) to the 192.168.xxx.xxx NT BDC.

Remote- NT Workstation, running behind a Linksys BEFSR41 nat router, dynamic
public IP (which has not changed in months).

The Problem:
I have loaded WinVNC onto that server and can use the Win 98 client viewer
while on the local LAN. However, when on the remote NT Workstation I can
successfully connect to Corporate, but I cannot successfully run the WinNT
VNC client. I can enter the IP address of the remote machine, I get prompted
for a password and the remote screen initiates, then turns all black, and
then shuts down.

Question:
Has anyone successfully connected VNC via a VPN tunnel of any type, and
specifically the type described above.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Scott C. Best" <sbest "at" best.com>
To: <vnc-list "at" uk.research.att.com>
Cc: <david "at" jdavidj.freeserve.co.uk>
Sent: Saturday, September 01, 2001 7:24 PM
Subject: Re: New user


> David:
> Hello! I like these easy ones. :) You cannot
> connect to the LAN from *outside* of the LAN because
> of the security provided by the device which is
> connecting that LAN to the Internet. Sometimes called
> a firewall/router, sometimes called a gateway, sometimes
> it's part of the DSL/Cable modem itself.
> Those things do (amoung other things) something
> called Network Address Translation, a process specified
> by RFC-1918. That address range you mention, 192.168.x.y
> is called a "private address range". So, as a packet
> travels from a network device to the Internet, the
> gateway device tranlates it into a "real", world
> routable IP address assigned by your ISP.
> So to connect to a VNC server behind one of these
> gateways, you have to point to this "external IP address",
> not the 192.168.x.y one. Write back with what sorta gateway
> device you're using and we can help more!
>
> -Scott
>
> > I have got WinVNC 3.3.3R9 running on my home network, between my old
> > computer and my new one.  It links fine through my network cards and a
> > coaxial cable.
> >
> > I have now taken my old computer to a friends house and connected it to
his
> > phone line, but I cannot now dial into it from my new computer at home.
Nor
> > can he dial into my computer from there.  I seem to have got all the
> > settings right, but when it dials his number, and it answers, my old
> > computer does not pick up the signal.  What am I doing wrong?   I am
> > searching on the IP number, which is 192.168.0.2 for the old computer
and
> > 192.168.0.1 for the new computer, which works fine on the home network
> > through the cable connection but I have never got it working through a
modem
> > connection.  How do I ping the old computer?  How do I telnet, whatever
that
> > is?
> >
> > Similarly, I have set up a network of 5 PCs for a client in Birmingham,
> > which happily use Winvnc to communicate with each other.  But I cannot
dial
> > into their system from here, even though I have set up their system to
allow
> > me to do so.
> >
> > Any ideas?
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